Adobe Lightroom after the shoot!

The important thing is to capture the best information at the time of exposure. It was drizzling so I didn’t use a graduated ND filter, but instead used the Lightroom grad filter. The adjustment brushes are some of my favorite tools in Lightroom. ©Kit Frost, all rights reserved

This is the latest edited version.  Although the darker blue version feels like it did at the time of the photo, I like the life in this edit. ©Kit Frost

This is the latest edited version. Although the darker blue version feels like it did at the time of the photo, I like the life in this edit. ©Kit Frost

From RAW file to edited version.

I love using Adobe Lightroom, for its simplicity in uploading, organizing, selection of the best images (rating), basic and advanced editing tools and its ability to simplify creating collections, exporting to email (I use mail) and uploading to social networks and to Photoshelter too.

For years I used my mac (and PC users will love Lightroom too) and sampled Apple’s iPhoto and Aperture for organization and editing.  I like to use iPhoto for more casual photos and to create books and slideshows but when comparing Aperture to Lightroom, Adobe’s product serves me better.  I have not upgraded to Lightroom 4 yet, but will do so soon as I also want to edit video and time lapse sequences soon.

Here’s an example of a “before” and “after” and I’ve also added a screenshot of the sequence of my lightroom edit for this photo.  I like working with raw files as they maintain all the original data and give me an opportunity to make photos “feel” like they did at the time I created the image. The idea of capturing the “light and shadow” at the time of exposure is important to me, as is exposing for the dignity of the clouds.  I usually underexpose by a factor of -1/3 or -2/3 and then open up shadows in “post-production” in Lightroom.

Here is the original RAW file taken with my Nikon D5100 and Nikon 16-85 lens
©Kit Frost

Take a look at the sequence of edits I used in Adobe Lightroom, starting at the bottom of the history panel

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8 thoughts on “Adobe Lightroom after the shoot!

  1. I really like the pictures! Being a professional photographer I understand it could be hard to find the best ones although
    they are excellent. I prefer several Lightroom presets to maintain some uniformity in my own.

  2. Pingback: JoesTechThoughts

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