Monument Valley Photo Workshop: Participant Photos

As a student of Kit Frost’s 2014 Monument Valley Workshop, I was very impressed with the entire experience. Having been an amateur photographer for over 40 years, I had never attended a photography workshop and had yet to explore the Utah Southwest. Kit was an extremely capable teacher / mentor and has a unique way of connecting with individual students to help instill their own unique way of seeing the world and capturing their vision within their own photographs.

Aside from her technical knowledge and her ability to capture amazing images, Kit was able to help me “feel” the geography and connect with the natural world in which we were situated. Her personable style and excellent communication skills then helped me to capture imagery that was forming in my mind. 

Click on the thumbnails to see larger images, and to comment.

While I have always felt I was a reasonably accomplished photographer, Kit taught me to see with light and “paint” my compositions with light and shadow in a way that elevated the final images to a level I had only hoped to achieve.

Friends and family have been astounded with the quality and composition of the images I made at the workshop and I am so very pleased with what I gained over the four days. I am looking at local scenes and geography much differently now. “Chasing the Light” has become much more than a catch-phrase, it has become a way of interpreting what I am seeing in everyday life and imagining how those scenes can be captured within the camera. Thank you Kit for opening my eyes to the light. My photography will never be the same.    Tom Fulton, 2014

 

Lessons Learned

We returned recently from our 2014 Monument Valley Photo Workshop.  And wow, the photo opportunities were awesome.  Although the spring winds in Utah and Arizona were sometimes epic, we explored locations to teach the participants composition, right place-right time, cloud shadows as subject, avoiding the “cliche” in a well-photographed environment too.

Our locations included multiple views of the San Juan River as it flowed through the canyons of Utah.  We made photographs using wide-angle lenses to capture the expansiveness of the Goosenecks of the San Juan, ate lunch at river level at the Sand Island Recreation Area, and photographed the big views from up on Muley Point to see the next level of the canyons and the tiny river cutting through.

iPhoneography, we hiked down from the Goosenecks overlook to get a better vantage point. ©Kit Frost

iPhoneography, we hiked down from the Goosenecks overlook to get a better vantage point. ©Kit Frost

We photographed with our iPhones, Smartphones, DSLR’s, and Point and Shoot Cameras.  And uploaded images to Instagram.

A mix of moments from our workshop.  Monument Valley

A mix of moments from our workshop. Monument Valley

Lesson: Find an interesting foreground. Lead the viewer through the frame.

Lesson: Find an interesting foreground. Lead the viewer through the frame. ©Kit Frost

Create a framing of positive and negative space to make a new image of a classic subject. ©Kit Frost

Lesson: Create a framing of positive and negative space to make a new image of a classic subject. ©Kit Frost

 

Monument Valley has been the backdrop of many movies, from Stagecoach to Thelma and Louise.  It takes some imagination to create images that are “different”.  We were blessed with clouds (and blown by winds) so we could use the sky in our images too.

Working with what is presented to us is very important in Workshop Photography.  We cannot control the subject or the sky or the wind or the crowds.  We CAN work with these elements to create images that are unique.

Keep coming back, as we will add more images as the participants submit them for this blog.

 

Use shadows to create positive and negative space in the big scene.  See if you can find a shape that matches the distant scene. ©Kit Frost

Lesson: Use shadows to create positive and negative space in the big scene. See if you can find a shape that matches the distant scene. ©Kit Frost

And just in case you think I’m kidding about the Epic winds.  John Ford’s Point was so windy, that we dared not take our DSLR’s out of the car.  Here’s a link to our You Tube video. And another short clip Here.

 

RV West Magazine features article about my photography and travel

I was interviewed last month for the current issue of RV West Magazine’s online and print edition.  Based out of Vancouver, BC, the magazine is geared towards unique RV travel and Adventures.  The writer really listened to me and wrote a great article about my life and love of the outdoors, photography and camping.

Thanks so much Jessica, for a thorough article and interview.

Thanks so much Jessica, for a thorough article and interview.

Click here to read the full article about Adventure, Travel and Photography, as a way of life!

Photograph Hot Air Balloons – January 2014

The 16th Annual Bluff Hot Air Balloon Festival is just around the corner; the four corners to be exact.

Kit will be teaching a special weekend workshop, January 17th – 19th, 2014.  Space is limited, as are accommodations in and around Bluff.  We’ve held a few rooms, so register for this workshop as soon as you can!

Reserve your space now.  A perfect holiday gift too.

$650. Personal Instruction and Accommodations in Bluff, Utah
To register, email kit@kitfrost.com or call Kit at 970-946-9727 before December 5th.

By using the Nikon 55-300 lens I was able to create frames that compressed the background buttes and spires.  The balloons, then appear closer to the mesa. ©Kit Frost

By using the Nikon 55-300 lens I was able to create frames that compressed the background buttes and spires. The balloons, then appear closer to the mesa. ©Kit Frost

Full compression of the 55-300 lens.  The background sure appears closer and the composition is fun too. ©Kit Frost

Full compression of the 55-300 lens. The background sure appears closer and the composition is fun too. ©Kit Frost

You can see the wind blowing the balloon to the left.  Shortly after making this photo, all the balloons were tethered to wait own the wind.  ©Kit Frost

You can see the wind blowing the balloon to the left. Shortly after making this photo, all the balloons were tethered to wait out the wind. ©Kit Frost

Up-to-Date Colorado Fall Foliage Color Report

I drove up to Silverton the other night.  The Aspen Grove on Shrine Road near Silverton is always the first  to change color each year.  Here are a few images from along Mineral Creek, near that location.

At the bottom of the hill, heading into Silverton Colorado.  The color changes here first each year. ©Kit Frost

At the bottom of the hill, heading into Silverton Colorado. The color changes here first each year. ©Kit Frost

I’ll say that although early, the rolling fall color in our area is beginning to show.  Set your calendar for a visit to Southern Colorado sometime starting September 20th.  Traditionally, I count ten days from our first frost.  We’ve been having lots of cold nights and so, we’re seeing subtle aspen color changing.

At the location of these photos, the Aspen cops will turn a variety of colors from yellow to gold to coral, to almost red.  Right now these trees are just beginning to change color.

I love this spot along Mineral Creek, about 1/2 northwest of Silverton. ©Kit Frost

I love this spot along Mineral Creek, about 1/2 northwest of Silverton. ©Kit Frost

Fall Color Photography Lessons in Colorado

Each fall, beginning in mid-September, I check the local weather, and the weather in the nearby mountains to plan our Aspens and Fall Color Photography.  Tonight, snow is in the forecast for the San Juan Mountains of Southern Colorado.  If we get a freeze tonight, we can look forward to the “rolling colors” beginning up north, Silverton first.  Shrine Road outside of Silverton is a favorite, as it Engineer Mountain (see the photo below).  I’m betting on the height of the fall, golden aspens, season to begin September 27.

We usually experience fall color change anytime between the last week in September through the second week in October.  We’ve had a warm and mild September, but today, the mountains are shrouded in clouds and it’s raining in Durango, with snow in the high country.  I count ten days from the first frost to get out and play and make new photos each year.

Join us this year for your Fall Color Photography Lessons.  Treat yourself to the amazing display of aspens as they change color throughout Colorado.

Colorado Fall Color WorkshopSeptember 27th and 28th, 2013
We’re driving the Alpine Loop from Durango to Dallas Divide, locations including West Mancos, Telluride, Owl Creek, Red Mountain and Molas Pass, and much more.  Register Here.

Sometimes an early autumn snow blesses us with amazing color ©Kit Frost
Sometimes an early autumn snow blesses us with amazing color ©Kit Frost
Right place, right time., right instruction, right skills. ©Kit Frost
Right place, right time., right instruction, right skills. ©Kit Frost

Join us for our Annual Colorado Fall Color Workshop.  Let Kit Frost take you to the most special places where the fall colors bloom.  We carpool from Durango to locations scouted just a few days before your workshop.  You will find us along the Colorado Scenic Byways known the world over for amazing fall color.

Learn:

  1. Compositional skills for Fall Color Landscapes, Aspens, Reflections, Mountains
  2. How to use your camera, Beginners are welcome, Kit will teach you how to use your digital or film camera, and to understand aperture and shutter selections.  Bring your point and shoot too.
  3. How to properly expose to saturate color (like the above photos)
  4. Learn “Right Place, Right Time” photo skills.
  5. Why using a tripod improves your photography.
  6. How to edit in the field to keep the best on your CF/SD cards

Monument Valley and Valley of the Gods Photos

Our Chase the Light Photography Workshop in Southeast Utah and Arizona: 5 days/4 nights photographing the monuments of Monument Valley and the spires and buttes of Valley of the Gods.   Eight participants attended the photo workshop.  Our first location was at the Goosenecks of the San Juan River, where I taught about using the widest focal length lens to capture the big scene.  The day was blustery to say the least, so handheld photography from the overlook rim was in order.  Students determined how wide they could photograph, set up their wide-angle lenses and chose an ISO for obtaining deep depth of field as well as a shutter speed that would avoid camera shake.

Learning about using our wide angle lenses ©Nora Whalen

Learning about using our wide angle lenses ©Nora Whalen

As the week progressed, lessons included metering properly for balancing indoor and outdoor lighting (we used a hogan in Monument Valley for that lesson).  By using the digital camera’s “live view” or LCD, to assist in metering challenging scenes, students learned to balance and choose the correct exposure.

Image 23

Discussing how to capture the varied exposures in the Hogan at Monument Valley. By turning on “live view” you can see exactly what the camera is metering.

An example of using "Live view" to meter the inside and outside of the Hogan.

An example of using “Live view” to meter the inside and outside of the Hogan.

Some students were working with advanced Point and Shoot cameras, some DSLR, some played with their iPhones and when we had service, uploaded their images to instagram and social networking sites.

The Road to Monument Valley ©Nora Whalen

The Road to Monument Valley, many people call this the “Forest Gump” road. ©Nora Whalen

Shot with an "in camera" effect: vignette. ©Sherry Ketner

Shot with an “in camera” effect: vignette. ©Sherry Ketner

Shot with an "in camera" effect: vignette. ©Sherry Ketner

Shot with an “in camera” effect: vignette. ©Sherry Ketner

iPhone Photography, Monument Valley, Instagram images ©Nora WhaleniPhone Photography, Monument Valley, Instagram images ©Nora Whalen

Image 22

One of the workshop participants, Anita, photographing along the 17 mile drive in Monument Valley

Image 20

Walter never took that camera down from his face. He had a great time on this, his first, photo workshop

More participant examples to follow.  I’m prepping up for a two week adventure, a photo and road trip to California.  More to follow.