Use your smart phone for video

Why Video?

Over the years I have used 35mm, medium and large format film and digital gear to express my vision. Upon returning from an adventure, I spent days in the darkroom, developing and printing in color and black and while. And as the digital revolution began I scanned negatives, large format transparencies and slides. I now work with digital files in the lightroom, my studio.

My goal is to create images that speak to the moments I experience.  I like the slow process of becoming familiar with the subject, letting it speak to me, and then capturing the photograph, or a series of photographs.

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Expressing my vision with video

On locations, I often find that I want to capture a sense of place beyond the single still image.  Today’s smart phones and digital cameras include the function to record video clips. I use my smart phone (iPhone 5s) and my Nikon gear (D5300, D5200 and varied Nikon lenses) to record short video clips when the muse speaks to me. I record a series of 30-45 second clips. Essential gear is a tripod to hold the camera steady, but a monopod will do too.  And there are really small tripods available for smart phones and they work quite well when set up on a rock or boulder.

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I usually collect about 10-20 video clips at the scene, and audio, I edit the clips and decide during post-production whether to keep the sound for the final video presentation.

In National Parks, it’s rare to have a location to yourself, so I often explore out of the way places to make my video recordings.  The audio can be edited if folks nearby are chatting.

I upload all my photos to Lightroom, rate and reject, then develop the RAW files.  I aim to reproduce the light, color and essence of the moments I photographed the scene.  In Lightroom, it’s possible to develop a single captured image and apply those changes across the entire group of photos.  This saves tons of time in front of the computer (because I’d rather be in front of the creek!)

Video clips can also be developed for better saturation and contrast than the original.  Lightroom has the tools for that.

What do you like to use your iPhone video capabilities for?  Family gatherings? Vacation? The Auntie Show?

Do you serve popcorn at your laptop presentations?

Links to Video Samples

Capitol Reef Video Sequence: Fremont River Song

Crater Lake National Park: As the Water Speaks (created during my recent Artist Residency in the Park)

And in Zion National Park, a series of still images combined with video clips for my YouTube channel. 

Fall Color Photography Lessons, 2019

Photograph Fall Color in Fabulous Southern Colorado

October 14-15.
Our Two Workshop in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado

Let us teach you how to photograph grand landscapes like this one between Durango and Silverton, Colorado. ©Kit Frost

Let us teach you how to photograph grand landscapes like this one between Durango and Silverton, Colorado. ©Kit Frost

Our Colorado Fall Color Photography Workshop takes place in the San Juan Mountains.  Round-trip from our accommodations at Cascade Village, we take you to our favorite grand and intimate scenic locations throughout Southern Colorado, stopping along the way to teach lessons such as:

  • Composition for the Grand Colorado Landscapes
  • Photographing Aspens in the Forest
  • Patterns and Textures of Aspen
  • Working with Depth of Field and Shutter Speed.
  • We make sure you’re familiar and comfortable with YOUR camera.
Photographing in and around aspen forests is a fun, learning experience on our Fall Color Workshop. ©Kit Frost

Photographing in and around aspen forests is a fun, learning experience on our Fall Color Workshop. ©Kit Frost

Day One finds us exploring the landscapes, light and aspens between Durango and Silverton, we explore locations for lessons at the Pigeon, Turret view, along Lime Creek Road, Molas Pass.

Skills learned:

  1. How to properly use YOUR camera to combine f-stop, shutter and ISO to make your images sing.  Discussion of what makes a good photo into a great photo.
  2. Aperture control for depth of field
  3. Shutter control for those “quaking” aspen.
  4. Choosing back-lighting, front, and side lighting to improve your photography

Day Two After an early check out of our accommodations, we continue chasing the fall color and mountain compositions that “call our names”.  We teach you to improve your photography skills.  Digital video instruction (optional) will be demonstrated as we make our way through the mountains, creating short video clips of your adventure, the forests, time lapse of the grand and intimate scenes.

We travel up and along the scenic highway from Silverton to Red Mountain Pass, Owl Creek Road to Silver Jack Reservoir.  The Cimmaron Mountains are our backdrop as we explore “near-far” relationships in the autumn landscape.  At sunset we will photograph the Sneffels Range from Dallas Divide, a must see fall scene in Colorado. Learn what composition skills are needed to isolate beauty in the “big” scene. This workshop ends at 5pm on Day two.

Skills learned:

  1. Using leading lines in your photos.
  2. Create near-far compositions and learn to select the proper f-stop
  3. Working with exposure compensation (+-)
It's always surprising to see the mix of color in our golden aspen forests. Let the landscape show off to you and photograph this awesome display. ©Kit Frost

It’s always surprising to see the mix of color in our golden aspen forests. Let the landscape show off to you and photograph this awesome display. ©Kit Frost

The Amazing Autumn Color  of Red Mountain Pass

The Amazing Autumn Color of Red Mountain Pass

Tuition and Accommodations

Accommodations in Durango are at Cascade Village where we share a 3 bedroom Condo.  Once registered for our Fall Color Photo Workshop, we’ll pass along more information about suggested gear, clothing. Click here for Kit’s suggestions for adventure gear.

Tuition, includes expert photography instruction, accommodations, light beverages and lunch at our photo locations. $1200. for two days

A light dinner will be served on our first night, and breakfast and lunch on day two.

For more information about fall color in Colorado.

And Why Leaves Change Color

And while in Durango.

Join us for our Adobe Lightroom class after your workshop,

Learn to upload, edit and sequence, title and add music to YouTube and Facebook videos.

Learn to Edit your RAW files

Capture the best information

When I capture an image, at the location, I pre-visualize the post production.  I learned when studying Ansel Adams, the Weston Family and John Sexton.  In the camera, we capture the detail needed to create an interpretation of it later.  In the past, using film, I used the mantra “expose for the shadows, develop for the highlights”.

Digital cameras do a great job of recording a broader range of tones than black and white and color film, but it’s still important to remember that if you are lacking detail in the file, although not impossible, it’s harder to “get it” later.

My thinking process in the field runs something like this:

On location, in the camera

  1. Seduced by the light, I choose the proper lens for the composition.
  2. Many times my hot spot on the lens is somewhere around f16-22.  I like deep depth of field when the subject calls for it.
  3. Evaluate the highlights and see how much underexposure they will need. Clouds in particular need quite a bit of underexposure to hold detail.
  4. Let the shadows fall where they will.  Oftentimes the LCD view of the images will show and image that looks too dark and lacks shadow detail, but this is where digital captures really shine.

Upload and Process the RAW files.

In the LIGHTROOM, I still use the important technique of proper edit, exposure, development.  Mike Yamashita, a National Geo Photographer once told me that if I get any more than 4 good images on a roll of 36 exposures, my standards are too low.

Using Adobe Lightroom:

  • Import from SD or CF Card, add keywords, copyright, organize.
  • Run through the first edit for out of focus, overexposures, boring images. (x-mark for rejection). Be honest but not brutal.
  • Create Collections of my favorites from that photo adventure.
  • Begin using the Develop Mode.
  • In Develop Mode I open the panel (Command/Control D)and usually begin with exposure, white balance and contrast adjustments, saturation and clarity are also important.
  • These days I like the fine tuning available to me in the HSL Panel.  Sometimes when warming up and image the sky turns a bit aqua so HUE is the adjustment. Specific saturation is then applied to hues in the image, and I really like the ability to adjust LUMINANCE at will on individual colors.
  • Compare these adjustments to those we used to employ in the DARKROOM, like dodging, burning, edge burning, contrast filters, etc.
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Before edits, RAW. 1/8 second at f22, -1/3 EV

Canyon hiking, Zion National Park

After editing in Adobe Lightroom. I underexposed the image in the camera to hold detail in the highlighted sandy floor of the canyon. ©Kit Frost

As you can see from this example, the RAW file looks bad, boring, and dark in the shadows while overblown in the highlights.  But since I underexposed by 1/3 EV, the highlights maintained detail as I had planned.  I knew it “felt” like a warm subject, so I interpreted it with a bit of saturation, clarity, highlight recovery and added a vignette. I often use a vignette to create a subtle or not so subtle darkness at the top of the photo.

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Before Lightroom, 1/8 sec at f22, ISO 100, 1/3 Exposure Bias

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After Lightroom adjustments, warmed up the sky, Contrast, Opened up the shadows at the bottom, added a vignette.

In the case of stormy weather, the white balance tilts closer to cool.  And I tend to respond to warm tones better so I often adjust the white balance and tint accordingly.  Interpreting landscape to “feel” like it did to me at the capture is my constant challenge, and when I achieve it, my great joy.

Camera Settings:

  • Most of my photos are either under or overexposed to hold shadow or highlight detail. I use Aperture priority mode and the exposure bias button.
  • I use AUTO White Balance and if I need more warming or cooling, I use Lightroom’s develop mode.
  • In the camera menu I set the picture control to VIVID, this gives me a tad more saturation and contrast in my jpegs (choose high quality jpeg if you don’t care for post-production)
  • I prefer ISO 100 for large prints, but will sometimes photograph using higher ISO when I’m not pre-visualizing a print.
  • I photograph using RAW and normal jpeg
  • I edit the RAW capture using Adobe Lightroom

 

 

Contest Winners 2014

I see a lot of contests online, and submit images when I feel my work is appropriate.  I received a link to these winners from Photography Network and the Women’s Photography group on Linked In.

What do you think about the winning images?  Would you agree with the judges?

TBM Photography Network, contest winners.

Monument Valley Photography Workshop • March 2017

Students take a break to pose for the camera at Monument Valley Photography Workshop, 2013

Students take a break to pose for the camera at Monument Valley Photography Workshop, 2013

2017 promises to be a great year for Canyon Country Photography Lessons.  We’ll be heading out to Utah for our 12th Annual Chase the Light, Monument Valley, Photography Adventure.   Learn to Photograph Grand and Intimate landscapes, Monument Valley, desert wildflowers, Anasazi ruins, at locations such as Valley of the Gods, Comb Ridge, Butler Wash and Mule Canyons.  We scout the weeks before the workshop to insure that we pick great locations for your lessons.

Meet us in Bluff, Utah or fly into Phoenix or  Durango La Plata County Airport.  All participants will receive a travel package upon registration and receipt of your deposit, complete with suggestions for gear, and additional information.  Early reservations help us to hold rooms for you at Gouldings Trading Post in Monument Valley and to confirm our stay in Bluff, Utah.  We can arrange for a full hook-up campsite in Bluff if you prefer.

Meet and Greet:  Let us know when you’re flying into Durango, we’ll pick you up at the airport so you can join us for a meet and greet at Chase the Light Studios, Durango.

Goosenecks of the San Juan River. At Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts through 28 February. ©James Parsons

Goosenecks of the San Juan River. At Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts through 28 February.
©James Parson

Valley of the Gods. At Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts through 28 February. ©James Parsons

Valley of the Gods. At Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts through 28 February. ©James Parson

Castle Rock, Valley of the Gods. At Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts through 28 February. ©James Parsons

Castle Rock, Valley of the Gods. At Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts through 28 February. ©James Parson

Participants will spend three nights in Bluff, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona! Register NOW to guarantee a space in this workshop.  Space is limited!

Looking north from Valley of the Gods, the storm is beginning to form, at sunset ©Kit Frost

Learn how to improve your photographic skills, or to begin your journey in digital photography, all skill levels are welcome.   We will be based in Monument Valley, and Bluff, Utah on the Arizona/Utah borders.   We’ll enjoy the night sky with lessons in capturing subjects in the dark in the Valley of the Gods.  The new moon on April 28th gives us the luxury of the dark sky for some experimentation and dark sky lessons; star trails and static star images are so challenging and fun!  Learn time lapse sequencing too.

There are many accessible ruins in the Cedar Mesa area of Utah. But don’t ask, don’t tell please ©Kit Frost

In addition to learning how to use your digital camera, proper compositional skills, and to expose properly in-camera, we teach ISO, white balance and manual and auto focus and add a touch of “leave no trace” skills and respect for the Ancient Ones and Heritage sites.  Join us in 2014 for four days of devotion to your passion for Photography.

Kit Frost has been teaching this Utah canyon country adventure for more than 18 years and will take you to the right locations for each photography lesson.  Bring your enthusiasm, your favorite camera gear, and your partner if you’d like.

Tuition: $1599. Early Bird (before March 1) $1899. includes instructional fees, accommodations, lunch and beverages
Register early to hold your space in this sure to sell out workshop!  ONLY 3 spaces left!
$500. deposit per person.
Balance due 30 days prior to first day of workshop.

Suggested gear:

  • Your favorite Digital camera gear.  Or new gear and Kit will teach you how to use it.
  • Your lens kit: wide angle such as a 12-24 lens or 18-55 lens, telephoto such as 55-200, or 75-300, A fast lens like the 24mm or 35mm 1.8 is sweet for the night sky.
  • Tripod,  Kit will look at your compositions while your camera is mounted on your tripod.  This helps to improve your composition.
  • Plenty of CF or SD cards
  • Fully charged batteries each day.  And a spare.
  • Battery chargers
  • Laptop or iPad for review.
  • Click here to see a suggested gear list 

Suggested Reading List:
Land of Room Enough and Time Enough, Richard Klinck
Scenes of the Plateau Lands and How they came to be, Wm. Lee Stokes

Just added: Location Photography Lessons

Hi Folks, The weather forecast for the weekend photo excursion to Bluff, Utah looks great, a mix of sun and clouds.

I’ve added three more locations to the photography lessons.

Moqui Dugway is an awesome drive up from the Valley of the Gods to Cedar Mesa.  With big views of the San Juan River Canyon and Monument Valley too

We will head out to Muley Point by driving up the Moqui Dugway on Saturday afternoon, the weather forecast is for clouds!  Yeah, No sky, no sky.  But with SKY< add sky.  I’ll be teaching the following hints for grand landscape:

  • Pay attention to your grand composition, watch for centering your “horizon line”
  • Create drama in the big scene by focusing on near, middle and far in the frame.
  • Actual focus point is important, choose a deep depth of field (f16-22) and focus about 1/3 of the way into your composition.
  • Use a graduated ND filter or underexpose the lower part of the frame to hold detail in clouds.
Cumulous Clouds, rain hitting the ground, deep San Juan River Canyon, and Monument Valley in the Distant landscape.

Passing rainstorm visibly hitting the ground, deep San Juan River Canyon, and Monument Valley in the Distant landscape. Just one of the amazing views from Muley Point, looking west. By NOT centering the storm, the viewer is led through the photo. ©Kit Frost

Kokopelli and other ancient puebloan (Anasazi) figures carved into canyon walls

Kokopelli and other ancient puebloan (Anasazi) figures carved into canyon walls. Photo courtesy of BLM, Monticello, Utah

Image showing the winding road of the Moqui Dugway in Utah with Mesas and Buttes in the Background

A favorite location, near Valley of the Gods and Monument Valley too.